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Webinar from the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture, focused on AsAms navigating anti-Blackness.  Names many of the difficult dynamics within White supremacy, including triangulation and model minority myth issues.
FROM THE ARTICLE: This frame highlights the impact of history and systems/community level adaptations that produced the current day interracial dynamics we see within the #BlackLivesMatter movement. More specifically, we shed light on a shared history of solidarity, the intentional puppeteering of AAPIs to uphold White supremacy and maintain a divide between racialized oppressed communities, and the internalized racialized images that inhibit community coalition building
Unpacks "defunding the police," emphasizing over reliance on police for public services and ways this undermines safety and justice.  Describes what alternatives for various issues might look like (mental health crises, forensic evidence labs, gun violence, domestic violence and disputes, police in schools).  Concrete and therefore good for folks who default to how police are necessary (perhaps, but are they necessary for everything they currently do?)
Practical, concrete list of frequent actions of collusion with anti-Blackness. 
From 2017 but timely for the current 2020 moment. Similar to many of the current calls regarding AsAm buy-in to anti-Blackness and the need to resist the White ideal and understand how Black liberation is central to AsAm liberation.
A resource list for AsAms seeking to understand racism and anti-Blackness. Sections on "What We Owe to Black Communities" and "Our History," plus sections for particular sub-populations (e.g. evangelical AsAms, specific ethnic groups) seem particularly strong and unique.
Vital distinction between ally and co-conspirator (accomplice, abolitionist): sharing the risk.
Provides good connections and analysis of anti-Blackness and the ways the constructed position of Asian Americans encourage passivity and using "invisibility" as protection
Vital distinction between ally and co-conspirator (accomplice, abolitionist): sharing the risk.
Vital distinction between ally and co-conspirator (accomplice, abolitionist): sharing the risk
A pointed poem about the costs to BIPOC folx of holding space. Wih a great associated exercise for personal engagement and reflection. While these experiences are most common for BIPOC folks interacting with White people, I think that White supremacy invites BIPOC folks to collude in our own oppression, and that of other BIPOC and ethnic minorities, by enacting some of these towards each other.
Makes links between anti-Blackness and racism, holding the both/and and centering injustice
QUOTE: It’s time for us to collectively wake up. The American Dream will not save us. On the contrary, the pursuit of the ‘Dream’ feels as though it is leading to more harm than good….That’s why as a community, we can no longer afford to ignore the injustices experienced by Black people in this country. There is no equity in silence.NOTES: links also to calling out sexism and misogyny within AsAm/Hmong community that connects to internalized racism and anti-Blackness
NOTES: 1977 call for solidarity to resist oppression.  race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Over 40 years ago...what is our progress? QUOTE: ""The most general statement of our politics at the present time would be that we are actively committed to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression, and see as our particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking. The synthesis of these oppressions creates the conditions of our lives. As Black women we see Black feminism as the logical political movement to combat the manifold and simultaneous oppressions that all women of color face."
QUOTE:...the moral choices remain the same. Solidarity or complicity. Rise against abusive power or stand with our back turned to the abuse of power. If we as Asian Americans choose the latter, we are indeed the model minority, and we deserve both its privileges and its perils.  NOTES: Provides some good information to complicate an overaggregated view of AsAms as a homogenous group. Particularly strong in considering history of systemic anti-AsAm racism. Sometimes seems to buy in to oppression oympics both within AsAms and between AsAms and Blacks, but steps away from this by highlighting capitalistic exploitation and relation to racism.
Protests, teachins, events. AsAms organizing against anti-Blackness
Provides some good analysis of why many AsAms are complicit in anti-Blackness, and links to colonization. Argues for solidarity and offers examples. Complicates the understanding.
article 403 Forbidden   60
Provides some good analysis of why many AsAms are complicit in anti-Blackness, and links to colonization. Argues for solidarity and offers examples. Complicates the understanding.
A call in to the AsAm community in Massachusetts. Offers a good example of a statement that works to do the both/and is more than words. Both/And: statement acknowledges and names the specific issue of anti-Blackness and related violence against Blacks while simultaneously acknowledging anti-Asian racism; it also highlights AsAm solidarity and connections with Black resistance and simultaneously acknowledge AsAm's ascribed privilege and triangulation within the White supremacist race hierarchy and the anti-Blackness within the AsAm community. Ends with an action-oriented commitment (what we will do different)--this could be a bit more specific, but is a good beginning.
Reparations are the foundation of justice.  This article makes the case for reparations.  Other authors and other articles have talked about different ways reparations might look but we must first recognize and advocate for the absolute necessity.
Problemmatic pushback from within AsAms against the Mass AsAm Commissions BLM statement (see http://www.aacommission.org/statement-in-support-of-black-lives-matter/).  A good illustration of the ways that positioning one's own oppression centrally can support divide and conquer and deny ascribed racial privilege. Also illustrates really well the ways that understanding the context of White supremacy is central to deep understanding.  A question for folks who may agree with the position of this article: did the original statement inherently (and publically) divide the AsAm community, or did the pushback in this article do that?
Non-Black people of color speaking out against anti-Blackness
Non Black people speaking out against ani-Blackness
Voices of Non-Black People of Color Against Anti-Blackness
Voices of Non-Black People of Color Against Anti-Blackness
article Coalition politics.   100
An important article that differentiates "home" from coalition.  Home being where you go for validation, support, belonging.  And coalition being where you foster coalition and solidarity.  Sometimes there might be connections.  But sometimes not.... FROM THE ARTICLE: [What happens when you let others in, others who are different is] "...it ain’t home no more. It is not a womb no more. And you can’t feel comfortable no more.  And what happens at that point has to do with trying to do too much in it...Coalition work is not work done in your home...And you shouldn’t look for comfort.  Some people will come to a coalition and they rate the success of the coalition on whether they feel good when they get there.  They’re not looking for a coalition; they’re looking for a home!...You don’t get fed a lot in a coalition.  In a coalition you have to give and it is different from your home.  You can’t stay there all the time.  You go to the coalition for a few hours and then you go back [home]...and coalesce some more.”
A resource list of scholarly and research articles focused on anti-racism and racism in psychology (as a science, discipline, and profession), psychiatry, counseling, social work, psychotherapy, & supervision).  From Ken Pope. 
Directed at White people, but seriously worth reading as an AsAm or other PoC in relation to considering the difference between racism and anti-Blackness
Vital distinction between ally and co-conspirator (accomplice, abolitionist): sharing the risk
When you get it wrong: "please don’t say, “I am not a racist.”  So what should that person say instead? Glad you asked. Here’s a template for future apologies..."
A list providing peadings, films/videos and other resources to understand AsAm history and positionality and race relations.  
FROM PUBLISHER: The pioneering Asian American labor organizer and writer’s vision for intersectional and anti-racist activism.
FROM THE TOOLKIT: This toolkit is a project of love from the grassroots, from and by Asian American communities. As Asian Americans, we believe that our liberation is tied to Black liberation and we continue to dream about a world where all of our people will be free....One of the strategic problems that this toolkit seeks to address is the need to move beyond the politics of inclusion and representation, to address the structural roots of racism. Demographic change is being driven by non-Black people of color – primarily mixedrace people, Asians, and Latinos who for the most part, have not yet found their own language to connect race and white supremacy to the conditions of their lives. This leaves our communities vulnerable to racial wedge issues, and requires us to have courageous conversations about what anti-Black racism is and how it works. NOTES: Absolutely essential. An *amazing* resource providing guidance for trainings and a range of resources.  Deep, critical race analysis from on-the-ground activist orgs and thinking.
ABOUT: The Education for Liberation Network is a national coalition of teachers, community activists, researchers, youth and parents who believe a good education should teach people—particularly low-income youth and youth of color—how to understand and challenge the injustices their communities face. The network aims to help improve the practice of education for liberation by bringing people together to learn from each other’s experiences.
FROM THE ABSTRACT: …. Asian Americans and African Americans occupy different status positions on the U.S. racial hierarchy. Although their relative status positions are important factors to consider in understanding their evaluations and interactions with each other, the influence of racial psychological factors are also important to consider because they may influence how status is perceived. Thus, the current study investigated how racial socialization, racial identity, and racial stereotypes influence contact between Asian Americans and African Americans. U.S.-born Asian American (N = 190) and African American (N = 304) adults completed an online survey….Results from multivariate multiple regression analyses suggested that racial socialization, particularly exposure to racially diverse environments, was positively related to the frequency and quality of contact, as well as willingness to engage in future contact for both Asian Americans and African Americans; whereas race-related discussions was associated with African Americans’ endorsement of Asian stereotypes. In addition, the study showed that racial identity schemas partially mediated the relationship between racial socialization and intergroup contact, and the relationship between racial socialization and racial stereotypes. Finally, findings revealed that African Americans reported more willingness to engage in future contact with Asian Americans than Asian Americans reported with African Americans. Chen, M. (2016). NOTES: Dissertation-Boston College.

FROM THE ABSTRACT: …. Asian Americans and African Americans occupy different status positions on the U.S. racial hierarchy. Although their relative status positions are important factors to consider in understanding their evaluations and interactions with each other, the influence of racial psychological factors are also important to consider because they may influence how status is perceived. Thus, the current study investigated how racial socialization, racial identity, and racial stereotypes influence contact between Asian Americans and African Americans. U.S.-born Asian American (N = 190) and African American (N = 304) adults completed an online survey….Results from multivariate multiple regression analyses suggested that racial socialization, particularly exposure to racially diverse environments, was positively related to the frequency and quality of contact, as well as willingness to engage in future contact for both Asian Americans and African Americans; whereas race-related discussions was associated with African Americans’ endorsement of Asian stereotypes. In addition, the study showed that racial identity schemas partially mediated the relationship between racial socialization and intergroup contact, and the relationship between racial socialization and racial stereotypes. Finally, findings revealed that African Americans reported more willingness to engage in future contact with Asian Americans than Asian Americans reported with African Americans.  Chen, M. (2016).  Dissertation-Boston College.

ABSTRACT: This chapter will examine the experience of internalized oppression within the Asian American community. The chapter opens with a demographic overview that clarifies the breadth and diversity of the individuals that comprise the Asian American community. In order to provide a context for the roots of Asian Americans' experiences with internalized oppression, the chapter then examines the experiences of discrimination—both historical and contemporary—that have targeted Asian Americans. This section will then be followed by an overview of the common manifestations of internalized oppression that have been theoretically proposed and the mental health and behavioral implications that have been found in the empirical literature. Lastly, the chapter concludes with an introduction to the theoretical and applied literature that addresses the critical issue of how to challenge the internalization of one's oppression. In other words, how does one begin to challenge and shift how one perceives him/her-self and the oppression that targets both the individual and their community?  Millan, J. B., & Alvarez, A. N. (2014). Asian Americans and internalized oppression: Do we deserve this? In E. J. R. David (Ed.), Internalized oppression: The psychology of marginalized groups (p. 163–190). Springer Publishing Co.NOTES: important as a foundation for considering barriers to AsAms acting as accomplices to Black folx
ABSTRACT: Racism is often thought of as existing and operating at the interpersonal and institutional levels. One aspect of racism that has been relatively forgotten, however, is its internalized component: racism that exists and operates at the internalized level. Surprisingly, even psychology—the field that is arguably best equipped to study the internalized component of racism—seems to have lagged in investigating and addressing this construct. Thus, we conducted a systematic literature review of psychological work on internalized racial oppression to better understand what is currently known, what the recent surge in scholarship has contributed, and where the research and service gaps are in order to identify areas for future growth. Overall, psychological attention on internalized racism seems to be increasing, and there have been some exciting conceptual (e.g., cognitive behavioral conceptualization, moving toward “appropriated racial oppression”) and empirical (e.g., development of scales, correlates with mental health variables) developments. However, our review also revealed a need for more work that: (1) utilizes qualitative or mixed methods; (2) focuses on the experiences of different racial and ethnic groups; (3) investigates how internalized racism intersects with other forms of internalized oppression; (4) clarifies the connection of internalized racism with other theoretically similar phenomena; and (5) incorporates social justice and advocacy in clinical and community services to balance unequal power dynamics that perpetuate racism—the root cause of internalized racism. NOTES: important as a foundation for considering barriers to BIPOC acting as accomplices to each other
A reading group syllabus with a list of readings focused on Black experience and anti-Blackness with a relative emphasis on Asian-Black relations. The resources link has discussion prompts and powerpoint for sessions. kw: relations
A history timeline focused on racism in the U.S. The default interactive mode combines points from all minority groups. You can access timelines for specific groups (Black, AsAms, Latinx, Indigenous Americans, MENA) through clicking the menu in the upper right corner, choosing "reference mode," clicking on the key icon to the left of the search box, and choosing the specific group. More specific timelines on Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, Martin Luther King Jr., and other topics can be accessed at "pastkey.org"
Discusses a broader consideration of "middlemen" minorities, including AsAms and Latinx and how they are used (and collude) to maintain Black oppression.
Discusses how the phrase "People of Color" has gone from fostering solidarity to problemmatic as used to maintain and avoid addressing the specificity of anti-Blackness. Provides important critical analysis but fails to address the issue of fostering solidarity and the ways that the problemmatic shift in meaning is, itself, part of White supremacy strategy.
article The BIPOC Project   60
kw: organization/movement
SFSJ "formation of progressive scholars committed to promoting and fighting for a political agenda that insists on justice for all, especially those most vulnerable. " Petitions, education, actions, organizing. kw organizations
QUOTE: "Since immigration reform and the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960’s, increasing numbers of members of historically underrepresented groups (e.g. Blacks, Asians, Latino/as36) have been enrolling in higher educational institutions (NCES, 2005). Inter-minority dynamics (e.g., Black and Asian) are increasingly prevalent, particularly in urban educational contexts where minority group members are over-represented relative to suburban contexts (Kiang & Kaplan, 1994; Rosenbloom & Way, 2004). ...The purpose of this paper is to offer an intervention model for promoting positive race-relations between Black and Asian students on campus. Our model, by design, aims to attend to the unique power dynamics occurring in interactions between minority groups, and aims to encourage not only change in relations between group members, but also change at the institutional level.". kw: Black Asian relations
Centers White dominance in considering how Blacks and Asians are pitted against each other and internalize negative views that foster White supremacy and social distance between minorities.  QUOTE: "By 2050, social scientists predict that racial minorities collectively will constitute more than half of the entire U.S. population (Bobo & Hutchings, 1996; Yancy, 2003). Complex interactions between minority groups are inevitable and raise questions about the relations between groups and groups’ members. In this chapter, we (a) integrate theory from political science and psychology to develop a model of “triangulated threat” for understanding Black and Asian relations outside of a Black–White paradigm, (b) review research on Blacks’ and Asians’ intergroup perceptions to support triangulated threat, (c) consider the implications of triangulated threat for social distance between Blacks and Asians, and (d) position triangulated threat within a context of White/European American dominance. Our chapter responds to recent calls in the literature for a paradigm shift in the ways in which we understand race relations (Alcoff, 2003; Perea, 1997). We offer “triangulated threat” as one model for community activists, theorists and researchers, and educators to move “beyond Black and White” in the ways in which they think, talk, teach, and write about race relations. Moreover, we position this model within a broader context of White/European American dominance, recognizing the ways in which the dominant White group’s constructions of racialized minority groups (i.e., the social constructions of the meanings of “Black” and “Asian”) promotes a “divide and conquer” strategy that maintains White power and privilege."
ABSTRACT: This article was collectively written by four autonomous Asian American grassroots organizations inspired by the #Asians4BlackLives activist formation that emerged in the Bay Area at the end of 2014 in direct response to a call for solidarity by Black comrades through a crisscrossing constellation of Movement for Black Lives (M4BL) groups. In July 2018, one of the editors of this piece issued an open national call inviting radical Asian American groups working in solidarity with Black liberation and beyond to consider collectivizing our voices for a shared piece to submit. The anchoring commitment was to center active sites of struggle within the discourse of contemporary Asian American studies by profiling summary reflections from the ground... We brought [co-generated] these questions back to our local groups and curated summarized responses from our respective formations – all of which we have attempted to stitch together here. Within our groups and on these calls, we shared our political commitments, strategies that inform our ongoing organizing efforts, and key lessons learned based on the different sets of material, time, and space conditions within which all our groups are organizing.  We discussed the parallel and unique challenges that each locale faced, especially around capacity, internal development, contexts for Asian-Black relations, countering anti-Black racism within our communities, and solidarity building.  This article is a snapshot in time of what continues as an ongoing conversation, our own gesture of commitment to staying networked and building together as we also build within and beyond our formations.  May Fu, Simmy Makhijani, Anh-Thu Pham, Meejin Richart, Joanne Tien & Diane Wong (2019) #Asians4BlackLives: Notes from the Ground, Amerasia Journal, 45:2, 253-270, DOI: 10.1080/00447471.2019.1671158
QUOTE: "In this essay, my main argument is that state-sanctioned violence, domestically and globally, as well as the geographic proximity of Black people and Asian Americans are motivating new iterations of Afro-Asian solidarity in the era of #blacklivesmatter. This article examines the complex history of Black and Asian American community formation in South Sacramento....South Sacramento’s settlement patterns involve a Southeast Asian refugee community...These are Asian Americans who have been differently racialized. To put it simply, they are not “model minorities.” Moreover, many carry with them explicit experiences of state-sanctioned violence and militarism. I turn to the narratives of local activists, community organizers, and artists to interrogate and better understand how they are working to actualize a new iteration of Afro- Asian solidarity in the era of #blacklivesmatter. This solidarity is directly informed by a shared experience with state-sanctioned violence, the dynamics of being in an urban environment, and of Black people and Southeast Asians being subjected to a similar racialization that often casts them as deviant. By foregrounding the narratives of Asian American activists across three generations – baby boomers, Generation X, and millennials – with differing approaches to solidarity building and activism, this work begins to illustrate emergent forms of Afro-Asian solidarities and their radical potential, underscoring contemporary modes of activism from a hyperlocal perspective.  Jeanelle K. Hope (2019) This Tree Needs Water!: A Case Study on the Radical Potential of Afro-Asian Solidarity in the Era of Black Lives Matter, Amerasia Journal, 45:2, 222-237, DOI: 10.1080/00447471.2019.1684807
QUOTE: "In places near the ocean where merchants sell live crabs, they display their wares in open barrels without tops. When the crabs try to escape by climbing up the sides of the barrel they always fail. As soon as one starts to climb up, the others who are also trying to escape pull it back down. When we try to overcome racism, sexism, homophobia, or class oppression, we often find ourselves in the position of crabs in a barrel. We work as hard as we can, but all our efforts fail to free us. We cannot get at the people who really have power, but we can reach someone from our own group or someone from another group no more powerful than our own. Instead of pulling ourselves up, we only pull someone else down. It is not hard to figure out why this happens. People with power want those they rule to be divided and to fight each other so they will not unite and fight side by side against their true enemy. If forced to make concessions to aggrieved groups, the powerful want the gains of one group to come at the expense of another, instead of acceding to a fundamental redistribution of resources and power. This “divide and conquer” strategy has been used more and more in recent years."
QUOTE: "a list of (mostly) films, videos, and television shows, curated to present the multifaceted ways in which Black and Vietnamese people have been represented in relation on-screen....It’s not an easy list to watch at times; There are many instances in our shared history fraught with violence from colonization, from military aggression, from xenophobia, from misogyny, and from antiblackness. I invite you to engage with this material from a place of learning. The point is not to agree with everything but to understand overall the different discourses that have existed in the media. I hope that our journey doesn't end here!"
Addresses history of tensions, ways that AsAms have perpetuated anti-Black racism and internalized this within our own community (e.g. through colorism), addresses dvide-and-conquer strategy, and offers examples of prior solidarity.
General call to non-Black PoC to step up within our communities to address anti-Black racism. Offers suggestions for steps to do this that mostly mirror general ally actions and suggestions.
Open google doc compiling posts and resources related to addressing anti-Blackness in AsAm community.
QUOTE: "For many non-Black people, knowledge of what Black people have done for the world is scarce. We were raised in a system that deliberately downplays or omits the contributions of Black people...[But] Our solidarity should be unanimous and absolute, without an explanation about what Black people contributed to our communities. Solidarity is not a transaction. Compassion should not be given only when we receive something in return."NOTES: considers true meaning of solidarity, not as transaction.
article Login • Instagram   60
Graphic of three pronged anti-racism (anti-Blackness) for Asian Americans: comments emphasize the important inclusion of addressing self-hate and internalized racism. A great simple graphic capturing a complex process. kw: solidarity, accomplices
Letters for Black Lives 2020. A letter drafted for AsAms (and others) to share with their (older/immigrant) family members, explaining why BLM is vital. Translated into at least 30 different languages. "We began as a group of Asian Americans and Canadians writing an intergenerational letter to voice our concerns and support for the Black community. We have since grown to include other immigrant groups and communities of color. Our goal is to listen, support, and amplify the message of Black Lives Matter within our communities." See also the great conversation guide (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B7PrxYC0H9ECtPmx4x3OQyOPLKaQS4xMYVNQ2jtDV7c/edit?source=post_page-----ed27ea67eb2e----------------------) that has terrific, specific guidance about how to have these conversations, responses to specific questions, current specific instances, debunking myths and much more.
QUOTE: "Before proceeding into this read, note that it is purposefully curt to highlight that non-black words about the Black Lives Matter movement are very not important right now. This is not a resource to learn about the BLM movement, it is one to explain why every Asian American should be involved in educating themselves and eventually becoming a part of the movement."
Offers specific advice about approaching anti-Black racism with AsAm family members. Good but broad overview
Guidance for specific actions to resist anti-Blackness. General, not AsAm specific. Places to donate, reading lists, other resources.
Awesome reading list of Black and Asian feminist solidarities. Hope!
One of the best articles addressing need for AsAms to step up against anti-Blackness, with brief historical analysis emphasizing shared struggles and solidarity. Also recognizes relative privilege. Addresses also covid-19 response and racial inequity.
QUOTE: "It would be a massive missed opportunity if we fail to make the connection between the stories of Amy Cooper and Tou Thao and our daily behaviors. It’s easy to dismiss these as isolated incidents perpetuated by “racists” — but none of this is just one person’s racism coming to light and none of us is innocent.We all perpetuate anti-Black racism in our daily lives. We can’t fight anti-Black racism unless we can notice its manifestation in ourselves and others on a daily basis in our workplace, social interactions, and online engagement."
QUOTE: "Asian Americans' privilege is an uncomfortable thing for us to consider, given the very hard journey our immigrant parents, grandparents or great-grandparents may have taken to carve out a place for us here, and the microaggressions (along with more explicit forms of racism) we still experience in our own lives.....[but] Asian Americans have a particular role to play as allies: We need to be loud. Because in the past, our silence has led to our being used as an example of a "good minority" that doesn't protest, a hardworking population that presents a counterfactual to the notion that America is racist, a magic eraser for 400 years of anti-blackness on this continent."
QUOTE: "Several experts expressed that this is a pivotal moment for Asian Americans to tackle the subject of anti-blackness in a productive way, beginning with unpacking the biases in their own communities by first confronting the historical context behind it." NOTE: provides brief analysis and history examples of Black-Asian relations in the context of White supremacy.
List of specific things AsAms can do as allies, especially in moment of 2020 BLM
2016 Liang case where an AsAm police killed a Black man. AsAm community divided with some calling it an "accident" and stating that Liang (officer) was scapegoated in sentencing,
ABSTRACT: I argue that distinct conditions of justice lead to diverse wellness outcomes through a series of psychosocial processes. Optimal conditions of justice, suboptimal conditions of justice, vulnerable conditions of injustice, and persisting conditions of injustice lead to thriving, coping, confronting, and suffering, respectively. The processes that mediate between optimal conditions of justice and thriving include the promotion of responsive conditions, the prevention of threats, individual pursuit, and avoidance of comparisons. The mechanisms that mediate between suboptimal conditions of justice and coping include resilience, adaptation, compensation, and downward comparisons. Critical experiences, critical consciousness, critical action, and righteous comparisons mediate between vulnerable conditions of injustice and confrontation with the system. Oppression, internalization, helplessness, and upward comparisons mediate between persisting conditions of injustice and suffering. These psychosocial processes operate within and across personal, interpersonal, organizational and community contexts. Different types of justice are hypothesized to influence well-being within each context. Intrapersonal injustice operates at the personal level, whereas distributive, procedural, relational, and developmental justice impact interpersonal well-being. At the organizational level, distributive, procedural, relational and informational justice influence well-being. Finally, at the community level, distributive, procedural, retributive, and cultural justice support community wellness. Data from a variety of sources support the suggested connections between justice and well-being.
I argue that distinct conditions of justice lead to diverse wellness outcomes through a series of psychosocial processes. Optimal conditions of justice, suboptimal conditions of justice, vulnerable conditions of injustice, and persisting conditions of injustice lead to thriving, coping, confronting, and suffering, respectively. The processes that mediate between optimal conditions of justice and thriving include the promotion of responsive conditions, the prevention of threats, individual pursuit, and avoidance of comparisons. The mechanisms that mediate between suboptimal conditions of justice and coping include resilience, adaptation, compensation, and downward comparisons. Critical experiences, critical consciousness, critical action, and righteous comparisons mediate between vulnerable conditions of injustice and confrontation with the system. Oppression, internalization, helplessness, and upward comparisons mediate between persisting conditions of injustice and suffering. These psychosocial processes operate within and across personal, interpersonal, organizational and community contexts. Different types of justice are hypothesized to influence well-being within each context. Intrapersonal injustice operates at the personal level, whereas distributive, procedural, relational, and developmental justice impact interpersonal well-being. At the organizational level, distributive, procedural, relational and informational justice influence well-being. Finally, at the community level, distributive, procedural, retributive, and cultural justice support community wellness. Data from a variety of sources support the suggested connections between justice and well-being.
5 Productivity Practices That Helped Me Finish My Dissertation
The rush to reopen colleges this fall ignores harsh scientific and ethical realities (opinion)
CDC releases new guidance for colleges on reducing coronavirus spread
Amazing restaurant by Santa Monica beach. Interesting and complex flavors for charcuterie boards and main dishes. One of the best.
A call out of the Chronicle of Higher Education's request to FoC to share experiences, with a great list of ways to undermine White supremacy in the academy through action rather than voyeurism
Good checklist about White faculty who "value diversity" but don't take action
Documents glass ceiling for AsAms, providing statistics in research in multiple professions including tech, law, banking, accounting, and generally.
Constructive and destructive criticism, effective strategies, primarily in a university environment.
A reaction to the law from a Palestinian member of Israel's parliament.
Reactions to the law, with links to background information.
article "Always on my mind"   60
A collection of photos and statements from older Palestinian refugees, together with signs of their names placed in their locations of origin, often within walking distance.
Provides a good overview of historical and contemporary context citing research.
Israeli racist laws and colonial policies represent the Israeli government and not the Jewish people.
The need for open access to taxpayer funded research, Sci-Hub, the Public Library of Science, and Plan S. Why activists like Alexandra Elbakyan and Aaron Swartz, along with advocates like Stevan Harnad, Björn Brembs, Peter Suber and Michael Eisen are heroes.
video Reverse Racism   80
Reverse racism de-mystified with historical and systemic context and meaning.
Boundaries, triggering, obligation, help, breathe, grounding, self-care.
Several suggestions, including a shift from access to abortion towards a movement for bodily autonomy.
Target the opportunity. Put the most important and relevant things first.
Really clear explanation as to why round-robin pronoun introductions are not a good idea.
Some clear perspective on a few common types of statements regarding mentally ill folks and psychiatry.
Rare persepective on Israel from someone who lived through all of the history.
Compelling personal testimony, perspective and call to action from a white professional basketball player.
Apparently a large percentage of the population perceives attention to problematic racial terms as a display of cultural superiority rather than a concern for social justice.
Sweden is choosing between immigration as an investment in resources or a separatist hierarchical model. The first is high cost, the second could unravel the country.
Debunks some common myths and describes a few types of publishable articles.
Tips for students to manage time and see more clearly what their time commitments actually are.
An example of therapy training social justice classes.
An example of teaching higher ed general social justice.
An example of teaching higher ed general social justice.
An example of research methods and social justice.
An example of research methods and social justice.
An example of research methods and social justice. Also see these related articles: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sound-science-sound-policy/201510/nature-survival and https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sound-science-sound-policy/201509/crossing-the-line
An example of psychotherapy counseling social justice.
An example of psychotherapy counseling social justice.
An example of organizational consulting for multicultural social justice.
An example of organizational consulting for multicultural social justice.
An example of organizational consulting for multicultural social justice.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of Community and Higher Ed social justice intervention.
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of arts and social justice (community and psychology)
An example of advocacy for social justice within psych orgs and academe.
An example of advocacy for social justice within psych orgs and academe.
An example of advocacy for social justice within psych orgs and academe.
An example of advocacy from psychology organizations and service providers to affect policy.
article Advocacy Required!   90
An example of advocacy from psychology organizations and service providers to affect policy.
An example of advocacy from psychology organizations and service providers to affect policy.
An example of advocacy from psychology organizations and service providers to affect policy.
Exploration of challenges of working across privilege, how we are shaped or caught by socialization in our own positionally to not see our own privilege.
Great article describing divide and conquer amongst racial minority groups. Can use as foundation of discussion of coalition building among PoC or interjectionally (e.g. with Finnerty, Srivistava, Sengupta).
An overview of where clinical and counseling psych are in relation to engaging SJ issues.
Challenges students to consider how being too focused on single oppressed identities may undermine social justice goals and necessary coalitions.
Discusses complexity of intersectionality. Encourages students to consider the pros and cons of having intersectional privilege.
An example of action from a privileged space.
A stellar article that considers defensiveness and White fragility in depth. Helps students understand the central role of ally development in activism.
Normalizes anger and helps students consider the relation of anger to action.
A great article on burnout that catalyzes discussion of how to engage AND how psychology might contribute by supporting the well being of activists.
A good article that helps students see that there is no perfect activism and consider what it means to be an activist vs to do activism.
Practical resource for social justice projects, particularly projects that are more movement based and aimed at addressing policy or creating more immediate concrete and identifiable changes that are controlled by particular people, groups, or orgs.
Stellar article calling for psychologists to move beyond remedial care to more actively engage SJ as systemic change.
Considers insider activism—activism working with the system to change the system, which helps students understand that working as a psychologist within psych is an insider stance.
An important article to challenge US students’ lack of knowledge about activism beyond the US, helps students realize that SJ activism needs to be directed from within to avoid paternalism.
Discusses different ways that emotion relates to SJ activism and movements. Provokes discussion on how psychologists’ particular training and skills related to working with emotions can contribute to activism and movements.
Discusses identity based movements. For psychologists, moves beyond identity as category and how groups form to consider the complexities of collective interests and advocacy.
Discusses SJ actions as lifestyle, integrated. Provokes discussion of how to engage in SJ actions on a more daily basis, and questions about what is effective activism and what is the goal for change.
Provides an overview of SJ as social movements. Psychologists rarely talk about SJ this way, but social movements are what others often mean when they say activism. A critical interdisciplinary grounding for psychologists.
A critical analysis of two organizational efforts of psych to engage SJ from an anti-capitalist lens. Raises good questions and critiques, pessimistically concluding “great expectations, failed aspirations.” Good for engaging students’ critical thinking about working for SJ within a mainstream org/area (such as psych).
article Wellness as Fairness   100
Central and stellar article addressing how psychological health is not possible without justice. Provides clear discussion of justice beyond resource allocation such as procedural and relational justice.
Good article for exploring connections of psych and SJ in practice, research, and as an agenda within the discipline - generally optimistic about connections.
Raises questions about whether counseling psych should be more tolerant of “moral diversity,” acknowledging that counseling psychologists may not agree on what is just, refraining from judging other professionals, and considering how values and motivations other than social justice might be central to counseling psych. Good article to explore the role of SJ in counseling psych.
Why won’t more people take action against wide spread injustice? Uses a review social psych research to explore how people understand social justice and why they might participate in injustice.
A really wonderful article that raises central questions for students about cultural impacts on meanings of social justice, and activism. “The purpose of this article is to introduce “walking in beauty,” an American Indian spiritual perspective related to social justice that emphasizes beauty, harmony, connectedness/unity of experience, and imagination. Walking in beauty includes 3 processes: embodiment, creativity, and appreciation of the sublime."
Provides a model of empowerment based on the individual’s goals and agency. Individual based but not paternalistic.
A good initial overview with basic definitions and approaches for activism directed at policy.
Syllabus for a project based course focused on teaching about social justice, including necessary awareness, knowledge, and skills. Uses a project-based approach.
Beautifully done dance video that captures the range of emotions and tensions, ending with a re-connection.
Reports on research showing that increases in tuition lead to decrease in diversity, especially for less competitive public universities.
Resistance to the single story or single vie of what it means to be Muslim in the U.S. Reflects the diversity of Muslims and offers some great initiatives
Excellent overview of longitudinal research showing the effects of race on employment, education, and social class mobility. And protective factors. Disaggregates by gender and immigration.
What Is an Inclusion Rider? Here’s an Explainer. A way to promote equity and access by using power to ensure change for others.
Good practical advice. "These backlashes against social justice scholarship and activism are a reminder of the pervasive nature of everyday white supremacy in our culture."
Digital Toolkit for Staff to Help Support Students’ Mental Health --wide range of issues and guidance for actually interacting with students. Pretty basic, rather than thorough or contextualized, but a really good beginning place.
A good but very basic introduction to why "positive" stereotypes aren't positive.
Students' response to the Parkland school shooting: protest, resist, challenge the system. Courageous. Also presents the normalization of school shootings and gun culture.
Offers three concrete ways to respond to oppression. The strategy of asking questions (rather than making statements to convince or argue) is one I have found especially effective.
Advice for psych doctoral students, particularly those more oriented toward being academics.
Some really good insight and advice for understanding grad school experience, how grad school is different than undergrad, and the need to understand yourself as a grad student as a developing expert.
Not much sympathy for the anxiety of the wealthy, but it is definitely true that excessive wealth is the problem. And its good to have an example of wealthy people trying to address the inequity from which they benefit (https://resourcegeneration.org/)
Higher education is under attack, and the approach of exploiting faculty and devaluing teaching is troubling. An alternative vision is possible.
A reminder that change is possible. And that relationships are a major influence on that change. Also that remorse is empty without future action to address the problem.
What if refugees were integrated and empowered? "All across Europe, oceans of housing lie empty"--why can't we find solutions?
Considers the ways that higher ed is being co-opted for “free speech” that advances a white supremacist agenda.
Thanksgiving—a myth, a day of mourning, a loss, a family connection. A possible reframe to focus on resiliency and survival and a day of truth?
Analysis of the attack on “liberal education.” Emphasizes erosion of diversity inititiatives aimed at equity, the co-opting of oppression and minority status, and the detrimental consequences of protecting hate and bigotry in the name of equality, “civility," and free speech.
Playing devil’s advocate in conversations about race is dangerous and counterproductive. Addresses issues related to how "equal" voice is not at all equitable.
Bias in mentoring and response from faculty. "Racial bias was most evident against Asian students, which surprised researchers…”. Depressing, not surprising. Good documentation of congtinued bias, bias which is often denied or overlooked.
Why "taking a knee" is seen as so objectionable and the relation of prilviege to resistance (the good kind) and resistance (the bad kind).
Nobody knows how many hate crimes and bias incidents take place each year in the U.S. Help @DocumentHate track them, which is helpful for education and resistance.
The importance of remember, not covering up. Historical analysis and connections: "Justifying and erasing hundreds of years of white-on-black violence has left many Americans ill-equipped to make sense of racist violence today."
Research analysis of free speech "defense" and underlying bias and motivation. "People pull out free speech when they're defending racist speech, but not when they're defending simply aggressive, or negative speech." And about how language normalizes social attitudes: "norms for prejudice are becoming more tolerant of prejudice even beyond what Trump targeted. So the bad news is that it seems that all prejudices are becoming somewhat more acceptable as the course goes on."
24 Books That Teach About Social Justice. Picture to chapter books. Picture books are great for reading aloud in college, too!
teaching social justice: resources, blog, video interviews, etc. Strategies and content
A guide for selecting social justice books for all ages. Reviews with social justice criteria
Taking action--social media and advocacy with congress and the White House. With samples. #DACA
Concise and clear relation of specific current events to the need for a moral movement.
"You cannot have a little injustice and call it justice." Calling for actual accountability for racism and White privilege and supremacy. Now.
Anti-Nazi film from 1947. Major connections with current 2017 times. Addresses the central strategy of divide and conquer, centers the manipulation of information and the consequences of race. See also: https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/14/dont-be-a-sucker-anti-nazi-film-charlottesville
Sexual torture: American policing and the harassment of black men. "stop-and-frisks are brutal assertions of police dominance of the streets."
A good distinction between diversity and inclusion versus and social justice and equity in higher education. How colleges are doing the former and why its not enough.
A focus on economic fairness while downplaying racial and gender disparity is not a unifying platform.
Revitalization, social challenges and rewards, more complex interactions.
A frequently overlooked example of Americans fighting fascism in the past, with some applicability today.
Police officer makes the right call to not take a life and loses his job.
General description, background and illustrative quotes from the march for science in DC.
Growing push to address the need to switch to a renewable energy basis. Actions nationally and locally.
Some personal experience and perspective on the Japanese internment.
Insights on LGBT folks in the military and what is required for leadership.
Well researched response to the resurgence of tired arguments trying to divide Asians and Blacks. Good point about avoiding responsibility for addressing racism.
Solid overview with lots of helpful background. Good starting point.
Comforting to see a significant turnout in support of science. Article has Links to videos showing turnout.
Description and perspective on the deep problems ignoring intersectionality in the ongoing attack on science and fact.
Some quotes from Michael Cox EPA resignation, and perspectives from those staying to continue to try serve the public good.
In the latest retaliation against faculty criticizing the school's anti-LGBT stance, the Gordon College president refuses to promote a professor despite unanimous promotion recommendation by the faculty senate. The entire faculty senate resigns.
Really helpful general overview of the legal immigration system covered in 5 minutes. If you're not familiar with it, this is worth your time.
Sydney University is using a MOOC to teach Indigenous history to a maximum possible audience. Content developed by Dr Gabrielle Russell-Mundine from the National Centre for Cultural Competency.
article Wall of Us   90
Four concrete acts of resistance delivered to your inbox each week. Great collection of defensive victories so far in the brick-by-brick section.
Resources for the resistance, conveniently broken out into Get Involved, Make A Plan, and Protect Yourself categories.
article News & Guts Media   80
News and commentary with integrity.
News and commentary with integrity.
A great series of interviews focused on resistance all in one place.
Private prisons are rewarded for locking people up. Now they are moving into slave labor.
Really great they finally acknowledged this, even if it was a long time coming. Harvard has an opportunity now to do something significant moving forward and we can hope they take it.
Great selection of testimonials from other transgender Americans supporting Gavin Grimm. The full AMICI CURIAE is available at http://www.transgenderlegal.org/media/uploads/doc_717.pdf
Take the day if you feel you can. Alternative actions and solidarity if not.
Some illuminating personal experience from the perspective of one transgender person.
Some good points and framing perspective when working together in resistance.
The fight against the unnecessary and harmful pipeline(s) continues.
Sheriff reassigns 10 deputies to more pressing work and saves taxpayers around $675,000/year.
Great imagery over an amazing speech. Absolutely worth two minutes of your time to watch and listen.
Great to see this level of international support for indigenous rights and the environment.
Great to see this being tracked on a dedicated site for reference access.
Great to see major philanthropic foundations stepping up to fill the holes being torn into the fabric of humanity. They shouldn't have to do this, but very glad that they are.
Some perspectives from some American women who wear hijab.
Day of Remembrance statement of solidarity describing the parallels that are becoming increasingly all too clear.
How administration policies can increase radicalization of Muslims.
Perspective on immigrants and the importance of showing up for demonstrations for those of us not at risk.
Well stated points on hard science and racism, with some great background summaries.
Then as now, many Americans don't seem to recognize the damage to their own ideals when acting on prejudice.
The amazing story of Fred Korematsu and others involved in the 1983 decision.
Inspirational message about how civic engagement works and what people are doing.
Great balance for the executive branch stream. See also: https://www.facebook.com/senatorelizabethwarren/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf
The latest historical step in fighting federal incursion in an area marked by a history of shameful actions.
One of the more inspiring actions winding its way through the legal system.
Rule that brokers should have a responsibility to their customers is upheld, but still under fire.
Legal challenge to capricious executive orders violating the President's obligation to "take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed".
Well balanced example of how political discourse and processes have changed.
Validates distress of racism. Provides coping strategies.
Propaganda machine now targeting Musk to try squash green tech.
Haters are gaming the search engines and using ad targeting to track down to individual levels.
article The Case for Reparations   100
A good, detailed, fact based case for reparations as justice, demonstrating the multiple and cumulative losses of racism. And the history of the precedent. "It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us."
Good overview of research on implicit bias, how to overcome it, and implications for police violence and bias
Challenges the myth that rich countries support poor countries--actually tax havens mean that poor countries give more $ to rich countries than the reverse.
article The Narcissist   90
Extensive psychological profile with background details and anecdotes.
Some good points on how the media might provide more realistic headlines.
For black immigrants, things were already extremely difficult. Important to keep in mind.
Useful guide to everyday intervention for all people who are able to help.
If the U.S. delays action on climate change, and the rest of the world follows suit, then it's a problem.
"The problem is not with the science per se, but with the set of an underlying assumptions about race that we always imprint on the latest science."
article Becoming Ugly   80
Powerful essay on how sexism and rape culture are normalized and on anger and resistance.
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/12/donald-trump-conflicts-of-interests/508382/
Apparently some members of the alt-right think other members are delusional.
Historical precedent for reframing the election as not having to do with racism and xenophobia.
A practical guide for resisting the Trump agenda. Advice for political activism.
Background on the authors of “Indivisible: A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda,” activism manual.
"Many Americans seem far more interested in making sure that those they consider undeserving — basically, the poor — get nothing than in making sure that they themselves get something"
Helpful tips on presenting facts to people who have built up systems of belief that don't match.
A proposed immigration policy that would have blocked his own mother.
Perspective and hope from a black father. "This is who we are".
Generation gap vocabulary bridging and valuable comparative insights.
The intelligence community is not happy about being dismissed over facts it has stated.
Some examples of the transition process being messed up via Twitter.
"America’s public education system is a civic institution — the country’s most important, in fact — that can’t be run like a business without ensuring that some children will be winners and others will be losers, just like in business"
"We have an incredible opportunity in the wake of this election as LGBTQ people to lead by example"
Good summary overview of some environmental victories for the year. Hope.
Full details and analysis on the emoluments clause and it's applicability.
Trump could be impeached immediately on taking office, and that makes the dynamics interesting.
A couple of blatantly obvious cases of law enforcement and our justice system condoning racial violence.
Apparently media access is so limited we first heard about Trump's phone call with Putin via reports from the Kremlin.
The graphic novel format really manages to convey this scarily deeply.
One of the more comprehensive an thorough high level action plans.
"Finally, write your own list. Don’t just copy this down. Edit it. Disagree with it. Improve it. Print it up. Put it on the fridge. Argue about it. The point of any such list isn’t to give you a pathway; it is to help you find your own."
"According to the anti-commandeering doctrine, it’s unconstitutional for the federal government to impose “targeted, affirmative, coercive duties” upon state or local government officials"
Succinct and deeply uplifting. Mentions the internalization process and how communities are coming together now.
Using twitter to change nuclear policy is perhaps not the wisest approach.
A timely overview of Milgram's experiment and some useful strategies to keep in mind.
Some background on dismantling of the outdated and useless NSEERS program and other steps helping to avoid setting up a religious persecution database.
Great example of preparedness training and how it builds community.
Good background on undocumented Asian immigrants and their relationships to other undocumented groups.
The commons as one possible component of a new basis to build from.
article The Case for Resistance   100
Some well considered points on appropriate behavior and maximizing a few available opportunities.
"Always remember: The news media are in the eyeball business, not the information business." Article also helps illuminate our roles as consumers.
article How Republics End   100
Framing of the central question of maintaining a republic, and recognizing that.
Good concise summary of many of the things that are not normal about this election.
Making progress on climate change falls to municipalities, as both a challenge and economic opportunity.
What is the difference between “identity politics” and central issues of oppression, inequity, or social change that relate to identities. Is talking about racism identity politics and is calling out racial groups different than talking about racism? Can cultural discourse really be separated from politics or the efforts to access policy influence through politics? Is dismissing “identity politics” just another way to maintain White, male, upperclass privilege? Some central questions here, but you need to look beneath to find them because the interviewee thinks he already knows the answer.
article Useful Idiots Galore   70
Good concise summary of the election manipulation.
Good points on where Trump's vision is fixated, and how that is a national security problem.
The updated numbers. Perpetrators in several incidents mention Trump.
Some concrete actions to counter long ongoing efforts to restrict voting.
Useful summary categorizations, geolocation, and size numbers although "Hate groups aren’t truly declining — they’re just becoming more covert and secretive."
Links sexism (esp “benevolent” sexism) with racism, outting that the basis of both is the maintenance of white male supremacy. "his language and emotional appeals followed a familiar narrative around the fragility and purity of white womanhood that is central to white supremacy.”
The incoming administration really is less educated. In aggregate the comparison of outbound vs inbound personnel is staggering.
Racism is alive and well in North Dakota. Seems to be fairly easy to find examples even with a camera crew.
Some background on the chief executive of Exxon Mobil's foreign policy and disregard for national interests.
The problem with this is that it is blaming Obama. To me, it is not Obama's faith in White America that is the problem. It is that White America couldn't/didn't live up to that faith…
Very good point about the large number of people in need of psychiatric care that will be left untreated if the Affordable Care Act is repealed.
We need to make the connections, not dismissing the intellectualism or the lived experience that is not couched in jargon with citations. "We deserve justice, and in order to win it we need to understand the complexities and nuances of power, of structural inequality, cultural production and hegemony, and every other concept and theory and abstraction that we need to claim our place as prophets of a new world."
article My President Was Black   100
Ta-Nehisi Coates’ brief (but long, for an article) on Obama’s history, position, racialization, and more measured response to racism. And on the Whitelash at the root of the election outcome. “What Obama was able to offer white America is something very few African Americans could—trust. The vast majority of us are, necessarily, too crippled by our defenses to ever consider such a proposition. But Obama, through a mixture of ancestral connections and distance from the poisons of Jim Crow, can credibly and sincerely trust the majority population of this country. That trust is reinforced, not contradicted, by his blackness.”
Reactions to the open letter to James Clapper from the Electoral College (before the additional signers)
An important document as a request, this is also a very good summary of apparent interference known so far.
Logical arguments why it makes sense to postpone the electorate vote for a month and investigate any election interference.
A continuing inspirational presentation of strength, compassion, and sound advice.
Awareness numbers for the term "alt-right". Liberals and educated people are aware of it.
“I think not talking about hate crimes and racism is extremely dangerous because pretending the problem doesn’t exist does not make it go away,”
Followup to one of the most basic and hopeful race conversations to come out of this election time period.
"“If ever the Time should come, when vain & aspiring Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government, our Country will stand in Need of its experiencd Patriots to prevent its Ruin.” - Samuel Adams
A better descriptive list than NY Times with more context on appointees past and positions.
Continuing to treat climate change as a question of belief, and making sure the U.S. is not leading.
More personal depth on the rebranding process, hiding the swastikas and looking mainstream.
"To gas light is to psychologically manipulate a person to the point where they question their own sanity, and that’s precisely what Trump is doing to this country.”
A rundown of the major Trump actions for the week. Even summarizing, it's quite a lot to take in.
Details on the process and mechanisms of silencing the press and going after journalists. Much of the current structure is just traditional.
Concise summary of the state of the presidency and weak-willed Republican majority leadership so far.
“The discomfort you feel when voicing your political beliefs (liberal or conservative) is not the same as being a member of a historically oppressed group.” A thoughtful differentiation of discomfort and oppression.
Solidarity, coalitions, and the need for the voices of black women who are at the intersection of so many social issues.
Some extremely practical and helpful advice based on lessons from history.
article The Tainted Election   80
“...nothing that happened on Election Day or is happening now is normal….It will also be crucial to maintain the heat over actual policies. “ #notmynormal
Priorities and points from one of more senior Democrat leaders.
Requiring photo ID for voting, and making it harder to get one.
Potential loss of sovereignty and culture through tribal-land privatization for gas and oil reserves.
Google got gamed and needs to step up their response to avoid continuing to be an active part of the problem.
Clear statement from a Republican presidential elector who does not believe the Electoral College can ignore determining if the candidate is qualified, not engaged in demagogy, and independent from foreign influence.
Some potent summary analysis and the need for real abolitionist politics.
The Department of Labor's fiduciary rule protecting American's retirement money takes effect in April. Betterment (an investment startup) is asking Trump to not dismantle it.
"If calling out racism is largely counterproductive, using a systemic definition like white supremacy is also unacceptable, and stigmatizing or shaming those who espouse racist beliefs is self-defeating, what tools remain?”
Some background on the march and key organizers Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez and Linda Sarsour.
The meaning of "resilience" has moved past hollow and into an excuse for bad policy.
"They were wielding anti-political-correctness as a weapon, using it to forge a new political landscape and a frightening future. The opponents of political correctness always said they were crusaders against authoritarianism. In fact, anti-PC has paved the way for the populist authoritarianism now spreading everywhere.”
Trump cabinet has more campaign donors in prominent positions than any president in recent history. Conflicts of interest abound.
Details on DeVos lack of educational background, strong lobbying, dismal results, and lack of accountability.
Combination of strong government and strong corporations to run the world.
mem·bic
/'mem.bɪk/
noun
  1. A link with a reason why it is memorable.